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but looking at narrower product lines. but now in coming to the u.s., i can look at all the different product lines in one geographic market, so it's a different way of looking at the business. much more in the trenches of day-to-day business in the market rather than in the headquarters of the corporation. >> host: for samsung's products is the u.s. and canada, north america, a growth market? >> guest: it still is. i mean, traditionally we've thought developed markets and developing markets, and with developed markets it's being seen as someone mature. but if you look at the last few years of our progress in the u.s. market, we've seen tremendous growth. some of that is coming from new categories like the rise of the digital television or the growth of the phone business. some of it is as we pick up our market share. we're the fastest-growing brand in home appliances, for example, an area where samsung brand hasn't been as well known. but now bringing the same mix of innovation that we brought to televisions and phones, bringing new designs, now we can also grab business in home appliances.
year in the u.s. come involving transportation crashes, 32,000 of those occur on the nation's highways are 95% of all of our transportation fatalities. so what do i see is the biggest risks we face in our nation's highways? first, impaired driving. the ntsb on this issue in our most wanted list of safety improvement. where the top 10 list of things that they can be changed. and impaired driving really had up that list. that is the number one killer of transportation. 10,000 people every year are killed and impaired driving accident. they made recommendations based on a study was completed and released in december and so we be happy to talk with you all about technology and i mentioned that later. another issue that's gotten attention is distraction. they are ubiquitous in transportation our life and i see many of them on the table here inside sure many of you will be using some electronic devices later after the embargo. when we talk about distractions in all modes of transportation. i'm pleased to be our investigations in a series that your interest is. >> we paid extra for this good
:00 eastern and our companion network, c-span. the u.s. senate is not in today as democrats and republicans continue their policy retreat. lawmakers will return tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. to continue work on a bill to reauthorize and the violence against women act. you can see this and that live here on c-span2. the u.s. house is in session. members passed a bill requiring president obama to submit a balanced budget to congress. the vote was 253-167. the house is done with less with a work for the wheat. members will be out the next couple of days. democratic members can attend their retreat. follow live on c-span when members return next week. coming up, live as a group of republican national security leaders from the house and senate armed services committee holds a press briefing to discuss averting defense sequestration. live coverage at 145 eastern here on c-span2. until then, yesterday a bipartisan group of house members introduced a new bill that would make gun trafficking a federal crime. that would also penalize straw purchasers who buy guns for convicted felons are prohibited from buyi
-- has omb done a study or an analysis of the overall adverse impact to the u.s. economy? i mean, we know how many federal dollars, we get that. that's pretty easy to get. but as omb dun a study -- done a study on the adverse impact to the economy? >> i will point out that a range of third party estimates is now coming, i think some of them have been raised during this hearing. they show a negative impact of .5 to .7% in real gdp growth in 2013 alone. and that's, you know, that's a macroeconomic statistic, but what it translates into and i think the president has been clear, that's going to translate into hundreds of thousands if not more job losses. and we've talked about how these are difficult economic impacts to measure because they have ripple effects. there's the, there's the pulling the $85 billion out of state and local governments out of federal contractors very abruptly and suddenly, you've got impacts down our supply chains, uncertainty impacting decisions to make investment. so for me, i don't know the .5-.7% in real gdp growth is an important macroeconomic measure. what does
. this gross disparity cannot be attributed to u.s. be more violent or crime-ridden generally because our rates of non-fatal crime and adolescent fighting our average among high-income countries. most of the difference is likely due to the weaknesses in our law that allow dangerous people to have guns. another claim is that gun control laws don't work because criminals will obey them and will always find a way to get a gun through theft or the illegal market. this faulty logic can be used to argue against the need for any type of law because lawbreakers don't obey laws. the truth is that laws such as background check requirement for all gun sales and other laws to combat gun trafficking help law enforcement to keep guns from prohibited individuals. opponents of gun control point to criminals obtaining guns from the underground market as proof that regulations are pointless. but the weaknesses in current federal firearms laws are the very reason that criminals are able to obtain firearms from those underground sources. data from a national study of state prison inmates indicates that about 80% o
into a good movie. >> do you have any plans on expanding beyond the u.s. for instance if to europe [inaudible] thank you. >> international coverage is really interesting. i think that we are trying every single print issue of the magazine in at least a couple times a week to always have international content in the next. so we have had reported pieces from venezuela or we had someone embedded in afghanistan and we ran up peace in the last two issues on that so it's really important. the question just from the business standpoint is the economics that more often than not it works best for us to work with freelance reporters contributing for us in "the new york times" as well so we can get the content in the magazines but we don't have the bureau in paris or coal or something like that -- kabul or something like that that is the key to having a broad magazine in the future. >> are you going to make it weekly again? >> i don't think so. we don't have any plans to. it was hysterically, the previous ownership brought it down to buy a weekly. when i first bought the magazine i was a little skeptica
't want. >> i'm a student of the kennedy school. do you have any plans on expanding beyond u.s., for instance, to europe? [inaudible] hasn't been very successful expanding to many european countries. thank you. >> yeah. we're looking -- international coverage is really interesting. i think that we're trying every single print issue of the magazine at least a couple times a week to always have international content be in the mix. so we've had reported pieces from venezuela, or we had someone who was embedded in the afghanistan. we ran a piece in the last two issues ago on that. so it's really important. the question for us from just a business standpoint is, um, the economics of it. more often than not it works for us, it works best for us to work with freelance reporters or who are contributing for us and luke, who i just mentioned contributes for "the new york times" as well, and so we can get the content, we can get the ideas in the magazine we don't have, you know, a bureau in paris or kabul or something, something like that. so, but the international stuff, i think, is key
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7